NAKMAS



Joe Ellis, chairman of NAKMAS (the National Association of Karate and Martial Art Schools) recently made the announcement in a press release that he has Asperger’s Syndrome.

Ellis has chaired NAKMAS since its establishment in 1992 and he is also the former President and Chair of Karate England.

NAKMAS is starting its Asperger Syndrome training programme, aimed at educating martial arts coaches about the condition. The program is set to begin in 2009.

Sandra Beale, the Equality Lead Officer/Director of Operations at NAKMAS is responsible for the program and she said:

“Individuals with Asperger Syndrome are well suited to martial arts as classes tend to follow a specific order, can be repetitive, and include detailed instructions with reasons. Students also work as individuals more, depending upon the discipline chosen. All these things are attractive to a person with Asperger Syndrome, and they can also gain confidence and more experience in social situations.”

Students working as individuals more, huh? Ah, yes, going MIA is good for sports events as well.

Ellis said, “I want to show that there is no need for anyone with Asperger Syndrome to miss out on the success and enjoyment that the martial arts – or any other area of life – can bring.”

The program might also show that there is no need for anyone with Asperger Syndrome to not attain a black belt in marital arts and thoroughly kick the ass of anyone who puts their safety in jeopardy-especially if they are targeted for their Aspergerness.

The last statement in no way represents the comments, thoughts, or wishes of Mr. Ellis and NAKMAS of course. It’s just extra theorizing.

2 Responses to “Asperger People In The News: Joe Ellis, Chairman of NAKMAS”

  1. jana Says:

    hilarious!especially the MIA comment.

  2. Lisa Says:

    This sounds exactly head on, though. I have an Asperger friend who really excelled at tae kwan doe (hope I spelled that right!)

    He would probably also call himself a Bill Gates follower.

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